My Vegetarian Kitchen Cookbook is Finally Here!

Hello Friends! It’s been a minute. I have been up to so much lately and as you can tell form the blog title I have a surprise for you! Been working on compiling the  blog’s best vegetarian offerings which you can now get as an e-book. I have always wanted to write a cookbook and I have said it multiple times. Putting together this e-book helped alight my goals and gave me a taste of  what it feels to put a valuable product out there in world. I am now so excited to be sharing this token of love with you!

GetMy Vegetarian Kitchen: 34 Delicious and Wholesome Dishes from A Kitchen in Uganda’.

With most of A Kitchen in Uganda’s food stories vegetarian celebrations, there are so many exciting, memorable and valuable dishes that have been created on the blog for the past 5+ years. This book is a compilation of some of the best of those dishes. The purpose for this book is that you can always have these creations whether you have access to the blog or not.

Who is this book for?

Whether it is planning a big gathering, needing an instant dish to satiate your cravings or looking for an idea for your next potluck or food business idea, this book is for you.

This book is for the vegetarian and/or foodie who would love to explore the endless possibilities that come with using less mainstream local produce and ingredients.

This book is for the creative ‘thinking-out-of-the-box’ individual who wants to make their food journey a little more exciting and fulfilling at the same time with ingredients that are easily accessible.

This book for the Ugandan and anyone on the continent of Africa that has to battle with the government imposed social media taxes. My blog has thrived because of the unlimited access to the internet that I have enjoyed and I realize this is not the same story for everyone which is why I took the time to compile these recipes so that you can have them at the tip of your fingertips with or without  the internet!

What is inside this 77 page book:

  1. 34 Delicious and Wholesome Dishes and Recipes from A Kitchen in Uganda
  2. 2 Menus
  3. Tips on How to Have a Successful Meal Gathering
  4. A Weekly Meal Plan Template

Go grab yourself a copy and start cooking!

 

Posho (Ugali) Video

It is time for us to talk about posho because as much as we try to deny it, it is a huge part of us as Ugandans. If you have passed through the Ugandan educational system, then you have probably had your fair share of posho (and beans) and then some! But to be honest, I have come to love posho so much that I make it on a weekly basis and I am seriously thinking of many other ways we can celebrate this high energy food. An E-Book perhaps?

I realized that sometimes it hard to put some processes into words so I have made a small video to demonstrate the basic procedure of making posho. While doing my research, I also realized that there are many ways to make posho. For example in Kenya, they prefer it a little bit harder than in Uganda while in Southern Africa (Zambia and Zimbabwe), it is preferred a little softer,  almost like a thick porridge.

Now with the above in mind here are some observations:

  1. For this video, I used yellow maize flour. Id you have white maize flour, the results will be the same. Yellow flour tastes a little different from white. This is not significant and is only noticeable if you have been eating white flour for quite some time.
  2. Make sure the water has reached boiling point before adding the flour. this will quicken the cooking process.
  3. Mingling vigorously and continuously will ensure that you don’t have lumps in your posho
  4. The mingling duration will range from 15-20 minutes. You can occasionally stop in-between mingling and cover the pan to let the steam inside cook the posho then continue.
  5. Once you are sure the posho is ready ( and doesn’t taste raw and “flourly”), you can cover the pan and reduce the fire completely so that it can cook in its own steam

Now that we have broken down the process, here is the video.

How do you make posho or its equivalent? Let me know below. Also what do you like to eat it with? I personally find it better with protein sauces and soups.

Githeri: Black Beans and Maize

githeri-AKIU-2

This New Year came with transitions and surprises but that is a story for another post! One of the greatest things was bringing home with us over 5 kilos of beautiful black beans from my grandmother!  We have cooked the beans in every way possible. First it was katogo until we ran out of bananas. We then proceeded to black bean stew which we had mostly with chapati because #kikomando. Soon we grew tired of them and then black bean patties took over (find a similar recipe here) which were amazing. I realized these beans are so rich in protein it is probably not recommended to eat them every single day.

On the other hand, school is resuming and we had to make snacks (think hard corns) for our cousin because #bigsisterduties,well, school is  resuming. We had to boil dried maize and then sun-dry it so we can fry it as hard corns. This githeri idea came about during those times of boiling hard corn and thinking of what to cook next with the black beans. This is not a new recipe because I know and have friends who eat githeri. It is just AKIU’s twist on the dish. It is an alternative way of eating beans and posho and I would like to think that in some way it is katogo of some sort. One thing though, it is packed with flavor.

 

What you will need:

Black beans, boiled and drained about 2 cups

Maize kernels, boiled and drained about 2 cups

2 Large tomatoes, chopped

1 Large onion, diced

1 Large green pepper, chopped

1 garlic clove, crushed and chopped

Ground coriander

1 C. Water

Royco chicken flavour

Curry powder

Black pepper

Salt

Observations:

  1. Any type of dried beans work for this recipe
  2. Unlike the traditional githeri, I decided to mix the maize and beans while frying.
  3. Make sure the maize in well pre-boiled and is very soft.
  4. You can season your githeri anyway you want

githeri-AKIU

Method

  1. On high heat, place clean pan and add oil. Add the garlic and onions and stir till an aroma is released.
  2. Add the tomatoes and cover pan. Wait for the tomatoes to become soft and tender.
  3. Add the boiled maize and the beans. Stir till distributed evenly.
  4. Add the remaining ingredients except the water. Stir occasionally till they dry out. Add the water and stir.
  5. Let the githeri simmer on low fire till all the water is gone.
  6. Remove from fire and serve.

 

This dish is great alongside this avocado salsa.

Let us know. Have you ever made githeri or eaten it?

🙂

Sophie