Sweet Mandazi Pudding

Mandazi Pudding. Have a party and you couldn’t care for cake that much, grab some mandazi, milk, eggs, sugar and all the aromatics and all of a sudden you have this impressive beast of a dessert.

Mandazi: The ultimate east African snack. Although this snack has multiple variations in each county, region and household, you can be assured that the feelings Mandazi evoke are the same across worlds. If you want a quick snack for visitors, Mandazi come to the rescue. In need of a quick but filling breakfast, Mandazi and some ka chai will have you sorted out. In need of a quick lunch without the hustle of looking for a descent eatery, Mandazi has got your back. I cannot recall the number of times I have had a pack of Mandazi on me for emergency situations while running errands in Kampala. What I am trying to say is that Mandazi are versatile. And to be honest they are perfect on their own. So perfect that they don’t need to be enhanced.

BUT.

Just imagine with me, if you will, what would happen when you take this trusty and unassuming snack and drown it in a bath of milk, eggs, oil or butter, sugar and all the warm spices and flavors, then bake it until it has soaked in all the milky goodness. Top it with thick and wickedly sweet condensed milk and sprinkle with some raisins. wouldn’t that be such a delicious treat? See, what happens now is that you have a completely different snack. I’m going to let the photos speak for themselves. Have a party and you  don’t care for cake that much, grab some mandazi, milk, eggs sugar and all the aromatics and all of a sudden you have this impressive beast of a dessert. I made it for my sibling’s birthday and I didn’t miss cake at all.

Sweet Mandazi Pudding Recipe

What you will need:
12-14 mandazi
1 can condensed milk
1 C. Water
2 eggs
1/4 C. Oil/ Butter
Handful of raisins
1/2 Tsp. Nutmeg
1/2 Tsp. Ginger, ground
1/2 Tsp. Cloves, ground
1/2 Tsp. Lemon zest
1 Tsp. Vanilla essence
1 Tbsp. Lemon/Lime juice
A pinch of salt

Observations

  1. I didn’t add any sugar since the condensed milk is already heavily sweetened.
  2. If you are using salted butter, you can omit the pinch of salt.
  3. Letting the pudding rest after baking will allow it to cool down and for easy removal from the baking pan.

Method

  1. Break the mandazi into bite sized pieces and set aside.
  2. In a clean bowl mix condensed milk, water, eggs, oil/butter, vanilla, lemon juice and salt till a thick milky syrup is formed.  Stir in the nutmeg, ginger, cloves and lemon zest.
  3. Soak the broken mandazi pieces  and raisins in the milk bath for 10 – 15 minutes.
  4. Transfer into a greased cake/bread pan and bake at 350 degrees F for 50 minutes.
  5. Let the pudding rest for another 15 -20 minutes before serving
  6. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice-cream

Use #AkitchenInUg to share your creations.

How to Make the Perfect Ugandan Mandazi

Lemon zest flavored Mandazi recipe that is sure to guarantee you amazing mandazi every single time!

Guys, you know that my love for mandazi is unrivaled. In fact, if I had not named this blog A Kitchen in Uganda, I would have gone with mandaziloveaffair or something around those lines. Yes, that love is real and so here I am, again, with another Mandazi recipe. I have shared Mandazi here  and here before but never a classic mandazi recipe. You know the one with the trusty lemon zest for flavoring. Mandazi are life savers and are not celebrated enough to be honest! I cannot recall the number of times I have had a pack of Mandazi on me for emergency situations while running errands in Kampala. Tell me, can you make Mandazi without looking at a recipe? This recipe is sure to guarantee you amazing mandazi every single time.

What you will need:

4 C. All purpose flour

1/4 C. Flour for flouring the surface and rolling dough

8 Tbsp. Sugar

2 C. Water

2 Tbsp. Butter/Margarine at room temperature

1 Tsp. Baking powder OR 1/4 Tsp. Baking Soda

1 Tsp. Lemon zest

1/2 Tsp. Ground Cloves (optional)

1 Tsp. Vanilla essence

A pinch of salt

Oil for frying

Observations:

  1. The water should be cold.
  2. Make sure your oil is not very hot because this will cause the mandazi to burn before cooking through.
  3. Cloves and lemon zest give the mandazi a warm and citrusy flavor.
  4. If you are using less oil, make sure to flip the mandazi occasionally so the dough is fully cooked through.

Method

  1. In a clean bowl, sift flour and baking powder.
  2. Add salt, cloves, lemon zest and sugar and mix well.
  3. Rub in the butter till the flour becomes coarse.
  4. Mix the vanilla in water. Add water to the flour and mix till a firm dough forms.
  5. Knead the dough for about 2 minutes until it is no longer sticking to your hands. Set aside to rest for ten minutes.
  6. After 10 minutes, flour your surface and roll out the dough to about 1 inch thickness. Cut out rectangular shapes from the dough. OR divide the dough into 10 -12 equal parts and form round-shaped balls.
  7. Place a pan of frying oil on medium heat. Let the oil heat through. Fry the mandazi in batches of 4-5 for about 7 minutes or until risen and golden brown. Makes 10+.

In the coming weeks I will be sharing a modified version of this mandazi in true AKIU fashion. Stay tuned.

Use #AkitchenInUg to share your creations.

How to Make Ugandan Daddies

Last week, the craving for bagiya hit so hard that I attempted to make some at home…. only to realize I don’t really know how they are made. *insert face palm emoji* I had a vague idea of soya flour and cassava flour but besides that I totally knew nothing. I was frustrated and a bit guilty because this is one snack I have had from childhood but had never bothered to find out how it was made or what went into it. I took to Instagram and was surprised to find out that almost no one knew how to make bagiya too! For the next coming months, I am on a quest to research about and make bagiya but in the meantime, we can indulge in daddies.

What are Daddies? Daddies are also a childhood snack that just bring back all the memories. Boarding school grub at its finest…If you have been through the Ugandan education system.  I am yet to find out the origin of the daddies and how they came to be called that in the first place. If you don’t know daddies, they are small bite-sized sweet fried flour cubes. Their composition is similar to mandazi although very crunchy since a lot of shortening is used. Since it is still citrus season (check out my last post), I infused orange juice and zest into these daddies to give it a fragrant aroma and fruity taste. They can be eaten on their own or as parfait, or in porridge and anything you like really. There are no rules.

 

What you will need:

4 C. All Purpose flour

4 Tbsp. Sugar

3 Tsp. Oil/Margarine/butter

1/2 C. Orange juice

1 C. Cold water

1 Tsp. Orange zest

1/2 Tsp . Nutmeg

1/2 Tsp. Ground cloves

1/2 Tsp. Salt

 

Observations:

To create layers in the daddies,  use the puff pastry technique of rolling and folding the dough. . Fold it three times before cutting.

Method

  1. In a clean bowl, add flour, sugar, salt, nutmeg, cloves, orange zest and mix well.
  2. Rub in the oil/butter/margarine til the flour mixture is coarse.
  3. Pour in the orange juice and mix well. Next pour in the water gradually until a firm dough is formed. Set aside the dough for about 10 minutes.
  4. After 10 minutes, knead the dough till smooth.
  5. Flour your rolling surface and roll the dough to about half an inch in thickness. Using a sharp knife cut the dough into small bite-sized squares.
  6. Place a pan on fire. Add oil and wait for it to get hot.
  7. Add your daddies and fry them till golden brown. Remove from oil and drain.
  8. Serve. Preferably with tea or hot cocoa.

I would like to know, what Ugandan snacks are you able to make at home? Which one do you struggle with?

Also do you think I should make a video for these daddies or not?