Curry Spiced Jackfruit Seeds Video

Curry spiced jackfruit seeds. Learn how to prepare them for cooking and how they can be substituted for other foods. 

Did you know you can eat jack fruit seeds?

I like foods that are versatile and have more than one use. Take a jack fruit, for example. It can be eaten as a meat substitute when unripe, as fresh fruit when ripe and as jam  or juice when over ripe. And we don’t even end there. The seeds are edible as well! I have been eating jackfruit seeds for as long as I can remember and it was an exciting part of the experience of slaughtering the jackfruit where we roasted the seeds after eating our weight in the ripened fruit. Such great times!  Now I deliberately collect each and every seed so that I can cook them. And in case you are wondering, cooking these seeds is not as had as you think. Labor intensive, yes, but not hard. In fact I made a short video that you can watch to understand what I am talking about. 

What you will need: 

2-3 C. Jackfruit Seeds

2 Tsp. Curry Powder

Salt

2-3 springs of rosemary/thyme

A splash of

Vinegar

Observations:

  1. Make sure you are using ripe jackfruit seeds.
  2. Make sure to use seeds that have not started to sprout. If a seed shows any slight sprouting or looks green, discard it. 
  3. The size and of the seeds depends on the type and species of the jackfruit flesh you are eating. Some fruits have thin flesh while others have plump flesh. 
  4. Jackfruit seeds have 3 layers of protective coverings. Two will be removed. to reveal a third layer which is edible and you do not need to remove it. 
  5. Drying the seeds helps loosen the second protective covering so that it is easier to remove. 
  6. if you don’t fancy curry since, you can use whatever spice blend you have/ prefer. Salt and pepper works well too. 

 

Method

  1. Slaughter the jackfruit.
  2. Remove and set aside all the seeds. 
  3. Remove the initial gummy-like protective covering form each individual seed. and wash them.
  4. Place seeds in a clean pan, add water and bring them to a boil. Boil seeds for about 30 or until they are soft and tender when pierced with a fork
  5. Drain the seeds and place them on a tray/flat plate to allow cooling and drying. They should dry for about 6 hours. 
  6. After they have dried and the second protective covering has loosened a bit, peel off the covering from each seed. 
  7. After peeling all the seeds, place a frying an on high heat. Add oil, salt, curry powder and the seeds and mix well
  8. Let the seeds cook in the oil for about 20 minutes on medium-high heat. Stir occasionally so that heat is evenly distributed.
  9. You can bake your seeds if you have an oven. 
  10. Add a splash of vinegar/lemon juice to the seeds  and 2-3 springs of rosemary/thyme to add to the flavor. 
  11. Remove the seeds from fire once they turn a vibrant golden brown color and  are crispy on the outside. 
  12. Serve as a snack or a substitute for roast potatoes. 

Have you eaten jackfruit seeds before? 

Use #AkitchenInUg to share your creations.

 

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How to Make the Perfect Ugandan Mandazi

Lemon zest flavored Mandazi recipe that is sure to guarantee you amazing mandazi every single time!

Guys, you know that my love for mandazi is unrivaled. In fact, if I had not named this blog A Kitchen in Uganda, I would have gone with mandaziloveaffair or something around those lines. Yes, that love is real and so here I am, again, with another Mandazi recipe. I have shared Mandazi here  and here before but never a classic mandazi recipe. You know the one with the trusty lemon zest for flavoring. Mandazi are life savers and are not celebrated enough to be honest! I cannot recall the number of times I have had a pack of Mandazi on me for emergency situations while running errands in Kampala. Tell me, can you make Mandazi without looking at a recipe? This recipe is sure to guarantee you amazing mandazi every single time.

What you will need:

4 C. All purpose flour

1/4 C. Flour for flouring the surface and rolling dough

8 Tbsp. Sugar

2 C. Water

2 Tbsp. Butter/Margarine at room temperature

1 Tsp. Baking powder OR 1/4 Tsp. Baking Soda

1 Tsp. Lemon zest

1/2 Tsp. Ground Cloves (optional)

1 Tsp. Vanilla essence

A pinch of salt

Oil for frying

Observations:

  1. The water should be cold.
  2. Make sure your oil is not very hot because this will cause the mandazi to burn before cooking through.
  3. Cloves and lemon zest give the mandazi a warm and citrusy flavor.
  4. If you are using less oil, make sure to flip the mandazi occasionally so the dough is fully cooked through.

Method

  1. In a clean bowl, sift flour and baking powder.
  2. Add salt, cloves, lemon zest and sugar and mix well.
  3. Rub in the butter till the flour becomes coarse.
  4. Mix the vanilla in water. Add water to the flour and mix till a firm dough forms.
  5. Knead the dough for about 2 minutes until it is no longer sticking to your hands. Set aside to rest for ten minutes.
  6. After 10 minutes, flour your surface and roll out the dough to about 1 inch thickness. Cut out rectangular shapes from the dough. OR divide the dough into 10 -12 equal parts and form round-shaped balls.
  7. Place a pan of frying oil on medium heat. Let the oil heat through. Fry the mandazi in batches of 4-5 for about 7 minutes or until risen and golden brown. Makes 10+.

In the coming weeks I will be sharing a modified version of this mandazi in true AKIU fashion. Stay tuned.

Use #AkitchenInUg to share your creations.

How to Cook Maleewa (Smoked Bamboo Shoots) video

Maleewa: Ugandan smoked bamboo shoots native to the Bugisu  region in Uganda. A detailed video showing you how to prepare this delicacy as stew.

Maleewa. This lesser known but essential food is a staple in eastern Uganda among the Bugisu region. The bamboo trees that grow around Mountain Elgon are harvested when still tender. They are then smoked and dried for preservation.  Maleewa is believed to aid in longevity and people who eat it live longer because of its nutritious value. Because of this belief, it is served  to every special visitor as a sign of respect and love and on special occasion such as weddings. Maleewa is usually cooked with either groundnut paste or simsim (sesame) paste. Preparing maleewa is not hard although the process is detailed. In order to make it easier to understand the process of preparing maleewa for cooking,  I made this video below.

 

What you will need: 

Maleewa shoots (about 2-3)

Groundnut paste (about half a cup)

1 Tsp. Baking Soda/ Rock salt

Salt

1 Tsp. Curry powder

1/2 Tsp. Black pepper (optional)

Observations

  1. Washing the maleewa till the water is clear removes the extra smokiness that may cause it to become bitter.
  2. Do not discard the hard parts/nodes of the bamboo. Instead use them alongside other vegetables to make vegetable stock. They add a unique smoky flavor.
  3. Depending on the size of the maleewa, one shoot can yield about a cup of chopped maleewa to cook with.
  4. Since groundnut stew is sensitive, it is minimally flavored. I only used curry powder, salt and pepper. You can flavor it however you want.

Method

  1. Add water in a large bowl/ pot. Add the baking soda/ rock salt. submerge your dried smoked maleewa and let it soak for about 3 hours. It can soak over night as well.
  2. After 3 hours, remove the maleewa from the soda water. Wash the maleewa gently until the water is clear. This can take up to 4 washes. Once the water is clear, drain the maleewa.
  3. Cut the soft parts of the maleewa while skipping the hard nodes. Slice the maleewa however you want to and set a side.
  4. Prepare your groundnut paste for cooking. Watch this video to see how it is made.
  5. Once the groundnut stew starts to simmer,  add the maleewa, curry powder, salt and black pepper and stir well. Let the stew simmer until it has reduced down to a thick richness.
  6. Remove from fire and serve with your favorite starch.

Have you ever had maleewa before? If yes, what was your experience.   Leave a comment below.

Use #AkitchenInUg to share your creations.